Skip to main content

How to Grill Safely #GrillSafely

 

How to Grill Safely

What You Need to Know

  • When handling raw meat, chicken, and seafood
    • Separate it from other food
    • Refrigerate it before grilling
    • Wash your hands before and after handling it
    • Make sure its juices do not touch other food, utensils, and surfaces
    • Use a food thermometer to ensure it is cooked to a safe temperature
  • Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours of cooking


Food poisoning peaks in the summer months when warmer temperatures cause foodborne germs to flourish. Follow these steps for a safe and enjoyable grilling season.

Separate

When shopping, pick up meat, poultry, and seafood last, right before checkout. Separate them from other food in your shopping cart and grocery bags. To guard against cross-contamination, put packages of raw meat and poultry into individual plastic bags.

Chill

Keep meat, poultry, and seafood refrigerated until ready to grill. When transporting, keep 40°F or below in an insulated cooler.

Clean

Wash your hands with soap before and after handling raw meat, poultry, and seafood. Wash work surfacesexternal icon, utensils, and the grill before and after cooking.

Check Your Grill and Tools

Use a moist cloth or paper towel to clean the grill surface before cooking. If you use a wire bristle brush, thoroughly inspect the grill’s surface before cooking. Wire bristles from grill cleaning brushes may dislodge and stick into food on the grill.

Don’t Cross-contaminate

Throw out marinades and sauces that have touched raw meat juices, which can spread germs to cooked foods. Use clean utensils and a clean plate to remove cooked meat from the grill.

Cook

Use a food thermometer to ensure meat is cooked hot enough to kill harmful germs. When smoking, keep temperatures inside the smoker at 225°F to 300°F to keep meat a safe temperature while it cooks.

When Grilling

  • 145°F—whole cuts of beef, pork, lamb, and veal (stand-time of 3 minutes at this temperature)
  • 145°F—fish
  • 160°F—hamburgers and other ground beef
  • 165°F—all poultry and pre-cooked meats, like hot dogs

After Grilling 

  • 140°F or warmer—until it’s served

Refrigerate

Divide leftovers into small portions and place in covered, shallow containers. Put in freezer or fridgeexternal icon within 2 hours of cooking (1 hour if above 90°F outside).


source: cdc.gov


Please retweet, share and support this initiative


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

#Alcohol and #Cancer

  The less alcohol you drink, the lower your risk for cancer. The less alcohol you drink, the lower your risk for cancer. Drinking alcohol raises your risk of getting six kinds of cancer— Mouth and throat. Voice box (larynx). Esophagus. Colon and rectum. Liver. Breast (in women). All types of alcoholic drinks, including red and white wine, beer, cocktails, and liquor, are linked with cancer. The more you drink, the higher your cancer risk. Why Does Alcohol Use Raise Cancer Risk? When you drink alcohol, your body breaks it down into a chemical called  acetaldehyde.  Acetaldehyde damages your DNA and prevents your body from repairing the damage. DNA is the cell’s “instruction manual” that controls a cell’s normal growth and function. When DNA is damaged, a cell can begin growing out of control and create a cancer tumor. source: www.cdc.gov

Frequently Asked Questions about #COVID-19 #Vaccination

If I have already had COVID-19 and recovered, do I still need to get vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine? Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. That’s because experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible—although rare—that you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 again. Studies have shown that vaccination provides a strong boost in protection in people who have recovered from COVID-19. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected. If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your doctor if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine. If you or your child has a history of multisystem inflam

Sleep and your health

  Sleep and your health Sleep affects your mental and physical health.  Getting good sleep helps boost your mind and mood and can help prevent health problems. Women are more likely than men to have insomnia and other sleep problems. 1  Changing hormones during the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and menopause can affect how well a woman sleeps. But there are steps you can take to get the rest you need. How does sleep affect my mental health? Your mind and body are healthier when you sleep well. Your body needs time every day to rest and heal. Some sleep disorders, such as  insomnia , sleep apnea, and restless leg syndrome, make it harder to fall asleep or stay asleep. This can lead to daytime sleepiness and make it more difficult to stay in good mental health. Having a sleep problem can also trigger a mental health condition or make current mental health conditions worse. Also, mental health conditions or treatments can sometimes cause sleep problems. How much sleep do women need each nig