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#Regeneron's #REGN-COV2 Antibody Cocktail for COVID-19 treatment - updates

REGN-COV2 is a combination of two monoclonal antibodies (REGN10933 and REGN10987) and was designed specifically to block infectivity of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. 
 
Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, announced on 29/09/2020 the first data from a descriptive analysis of a seamless Phase 1/2/3 trial of its investigational antibody cocktail REGN-COV2 showing it reduced viral load and the time to alleviate symptoms in non-hospitalized patients with COVID-19. REGN-COV2 also showed positive trends in reducing medical visits. The ongoing, randomized, double-blind trial measures the effect of adding REGN-COV2 to usual standard-of-care, compared to adding placebo to standard-of-care. 

REGN-COV2 rapidly reduced viral load through Day 7 in seronegative patients (key virologic endpoint). Patients with increasingly higher baseline viral levels had correspondingly greater reductions in viral load at Day 7 with REGN-COV2 treatment. 
Patients who were seronegative and/or had higher baseline viral levels also had greater benefits in terms of symptom alleviation. 

SOURCE Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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